More than one way to skin a cat!

So you may remember that a few days ago I posted a very radical transdermal strip removal that involved a very large amount of tissue being removed, with the motivating factor being dealing with large bald spots that had formed around the transdermals. Anyway, it created quite the furor in the entry, with many people feeling that too much tissue had been removed. Now, personally, I actually didn’t think it was all that bad a method, but in fairness I think it’s also important to post what more conservative practitioners felt a safer removal would be.

Steve Truitt just took out J5th‘s top transdermal (five years old) and he wanted me to show that the removals can be done far less invasively… What’s funny is when he took it out, it was all bent! I guess he took a blow to the head some time ago and didn’t even know it had damaged the transdermal! Apparently he has a hard head.

In terms of relating this to the larger removal posted earlier, this method would not address the baldspots of course and I believe has slightly more potential for scarring (assuming good healing in both cases), but it does involve hugely less risk to the client and practitioner and there’s a lot to be said for not risking seriously injuring your friends. The one above is fresh, and a smaller transdermal design, so let me also share the removal that Steve did on _Stigmata_, since I have a healed shot of that:

Anyway, bring on the yelling about it all. :-)

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About Shannon Larratt

Shannon Larratt is the founder of BME (1994) and its former editor and publisher. After a four year hiatus between 2008 and 2012, Shannon is back adding his commentary to ModBlog. It should be noted that any comments in these entries are the opinion of Shannon Larratt and may or may not be shared by LLC or the other staff or members of BME. Entry text Copyright © Shannon Larratt. Reproduced under license by LLC. Pictures may be copyright to their respective owners. You can also find Shannon at Zentastic or on Facebook.

24 thoughts on “More than one way to skin a cat!

  1. the scarring is not that bad on stigmata. and if people want transdermals in their head where hair grows they should already be knowing the risks as long as the practitioner is responsible and lets them know the risks.

  2. #3 – don’t comment if you haven’t bothered reading all about the other person’s situation! Silicun DID know the risks, and the strip removal was in his (informed) opinion, the best option FOR HIM.

    i personally thought it was a little difficult from that angle to really judge what the scarring looked like, and i dont think the top picture was in any way comparable to silicun’s choice of removal when it was just ONE being removed and not amongst his hair. and even just the removal of them singley still looks pretty brutal. by the looks of things if a strip of them were taken out that way it probably wouldnt leave THAT much skin untouched and would end up pretty similar (but messier) than silicun’s anyway..

  3. These types of removal documentations should be taken into deep consideration when looking into having any type of implant procedure.

    Clients should know that scarring of any degree – moderate to extreme – is likely to happen.
    That said, I think it’s up to the practitioner to be finding the safest method of removal that will result in the easiest healing with minimal trauma.
    Steve Truitt’s removals look clean and necessary to the procedure. I thought the whole strip removal looked very extreme and possibly unncessary when compared to alternate removals such as these.
    Not to mention quite “heaty” as far as what many extreme modification artists do.
    Flaying off a large section of tissue and leaving an open wound of that size open to the elements surrounding the procedure for any period of time seems quite risky. Not only to the client, but to people who would see this as a procedure NOT to be left in the hands of a “body piercer” and take action against such practises.

  4. in the second to last picture he looks totally zoned out. even his cute septum tusk is zoned out.

  5. I have no problem with this method of removal, seemed to work out well for the people having them removed, just as the other removal seemed to work out as well.

  6. Wait– is that two different guys in the bottom row? The left side of the forehead tattoo is different, but *everything* else is the same. What’s going on?

  7. Personally I think Stigmata looks even sexier with the scars… if thats even possible.

  8. they both just happen to have forehead transdermas AND facial tattoos…maybe they’re in a club together

  9. i prefere this metod to remove it…take out the entire strip is orrible… can chance your face like an extreme lifting and have no sense.

  10. i remember seeing that removal on stigmata. though it is far less of a brutal removal than the strip that was removed, i think it was still pretty gorey. i like this method of removal, it healed wonderfully on my forehead….

  11. I have a transdermal on my wrist that is going to be 2 years old next month and it looks great, but these pictures and the picture of the strip removal are a constant reminder of what almost certainly is to come… enjoy it while you have it, I guess.

  12. MBL: If I’m reading your question properly… it’s the same guy in all of the bottom row pictures. He simply altered the facial tattoo at some point after getting the transdermals.

  13. Why would anyone want to do this to themselves? I’m not trying to be negative, or mean, but… why? I mean, is it just cuz it looks “COOL”? Or is it religious? …piercings are one thing, but huge ridges on your forehead are a little extreme in my opinion. it looks……….. painful.. and then some. why would you do that to yourself? What about when you’re 80 and you look like an old Klingon (star trek)? Do you just not plan on getting old? …..I’m not poking fun or anything, believe me, I have my extremes, but… wow.

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