Ice cream cone and cupcake implants

A while back I posted a pair of shaped implants — an ice cream cone and a cupcake — recently after Brian (Pure Body Arts, Brooklyn NY) did them on Squirrelgirl. They’re healed now, and the definition on them is amazing, so I thought it would be good to post them and show how they look now.

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About Shannon Larratt

Shannon Larratt is the founder of BME (1994) and its former editor and publisher. After a four year hiatus between 2008 and 2012, Shannon is back adding his commentary to ModBlog. It should be noted that any comments in these entries are the opinion of Shannon Larratt and may or may not be shared by LLC or the other staff or members of BME. Entry text Copyright © Shannon Larratt. Reproduced under license by LLC. Pictures may be copyright to their respective owners. You can also find Shannon at Zentastic or on Facebook.

53 thoughts on “Ice cream cone and cupcake implants

  1. i’m pretty surprised at the definition, too. they looked like oddly shaped cysts at first, heh.

  2. Wow, the difference between these and the first shots is like night and day. I had no idea it was possible for such fine detail to show through the skin.

    Hooray for followup posts.

  3. I’m sure I’m not the only one, but I really really want to run my fingers over her hands and see how this feels!

    The definition is superb, this makes me actually bring in implants into things I’d consider.

  4. I’ve got to ask: Do they hurt? Or move around? That would give me the willies if they moved around. Or maybe not… Then I would end up being totally distracted by playing with them all the time. :)

    Very cool follow-up; they look really amazing. I never see cool shit like this on the people in this crappy little town where I live.

  5. Is there any risk to having texture on an implant like that (bacteria adhering to the surface and hiding in the crevices) versus a more traditionally shaped “smooth” implant? I’ve read cases (usually medical implants) of bacteria entering the body through a wound, collecting around an implant, and then causing an infection within the body without the person knowing until the infection was in later stages. Usually the cases were due to implants breaking down or having rough edges — are there any risks to having intentionally “rough” edges on an implant like this?

  6. Alan,

    I know what you’re explaining about the risks of roughness and crevices and gaps, but you’d need to see these pieces to understand the difference, i suppose. the contours in the cone and wrapper are as smooth as the rest of the piece. I used a 2.5mm biopsy punch and just carved out the lines in a single, non-stop motion. they weren’t cut out with the scalpel, as that would’ve run the risks you speak of. Infections that you’re explaining are caused by tiny cracks or cuts into the pieces that bacteria and blood can get into that the body’s natural immune system can’t reach to combat. A good question indeed, though. If i tried to just cut out the lines with a scalpel, i definitely could’ve run the risk you explained.

  7. Interesting. I wonder if the ridges are irritating under the skin, though. It seems like it would create lots of un-scratchable itches.

  8. it’s amazing to see that you can have implants of this detail! I remember when all I could find in galleries were half domes and ridges pretty much!

    Go Brian!

  9. I’m a peripheral observer to the bodymod world (I do have a tattoo), so forgive me if this comes off as a dumb question: Every time I see a picture of implants like that it drives me nuts because it seems to me there should a sizeable scar next to it where the implant was put in. I see a scar on next to the cupcake, but it doesn’t look anywhere near big enough to slide that whole thing in. I don’t see anything by the ice cream cone. Am I just blind? Missing something? I’m wildly curious.

  10. The scar for the cone is hidden by a shadow, but it’s there if you look closely. I have to admit I wasn’t sold on these when I saw the initial picture, but they look great now that they’re healed! Very nice work.

  11. I’m with #18.
    Wow…these look so much better. Still don’t think I’d want them, but it’s good to see them looking this much better and more defined. Kudos.

  12. These look so much better now that they’re healed, but I’m still wary of hand implants. Those bones are just too delicate for me to feel comfortable with the idea of having something resting on top of them like that, especially with how mobile your hands are. Give me a call when you’re fifty and tell me how you feel about them, then I’ll make up my mind on them.
    I prefer the more tried-and-true methods of body modification.

  13. #16 my fiance has a skull and crossbone on his hand that healed great. it was done by the lovely mister decker as well

  14. The definition truly is amazing. I’d really like to know about the comfort level. Personally, I’d be concerned about the irritation they could cause to tendons, muscles, nerves, and fascia. Has anyone ever developed Compartment Syndrome from implants?

  15. They are nice implants and all but I would like to see a picture of them with a relaxed hand, her knuckles look a little pail and thumbs look a little red from pressure, tensing up the hand and pulling the skin tighter to make them “pop” a little more.

  16. they look pretty amazing, I did not even know such advanced patterns could come out so clearly!where did u get it done?

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