PS. Check out her IAM page’s art gallery!


This entry was posted in ModBlog and tagged , , by Shannon Larratt. Bookmark the permalink.

About Shannon Larratt

Shannon Larratt is the founder of BME (1994) and its former editor and publisher. After a four year hiatus between 2008 and 2012, Shannon is back adding his commentary to ModBlog. It should be noted that any comments in these entries are the opinion of Shannon Larratt and may or may not be shared by LLC or the other staff or members of BME. Entry text Copyright © Shannon Larratt. Reproduced under license by LLC. Pictures may be copyright to their respective owners. You can also find Shannon at Zentastic or on Facebook.

51 thoughts on “PS. Check out her IAM page’s art gallery!

  1. Wonder if people will stop bitching about posting skinny girls all the time…or if they will just pick on her flaws as well (of which i see none!)

    Great pic!

  2. I love how she lets you see a little something, but keeps just enough covered for your imagination.

  3. YAY – well done everyone appreciating a beautiful lady with curves. Shes so lovely.

  4. maddam, if you would be so kind as to accept my hand in marriage. that would be marvelous. thnxxx

  5. don’t worry thinner ladies, shannon definitely still loves you and wants to see more of you, and speaking for myself now, i definitely want to see those pics of you lovely girls. this girl is really beautiful as well but my preference is thinner girls. people just always want to find something to complain about.

  6. this is not related to this picture specifically, though it is beautiful. When I first saw it on iam I knew it would be modblogged…
    Anyway, I think this whole “skinny”/”big” debate that has been going on in these comment forums is interesting. Annoying, but interesting. As someone who doesn’t fit into either category, I think the chice of the word “curvy” to describe bigger girls is interesting, because not all bigger girls are curvy, and not all skinny girls are not curvy. I also think it is interesting that so many people have been complaining about how shannon doesn’t post enough “curvy” girls, but noone complains that the images of bigger girls that are posted still adhere to a stereotypical notion of feminine beauty – visible waist, large breasts, hips. So when someone says “finally, a real woman” it’s like saying that women with small breasts aren’t real women, or that bigger girls without hourglass figures aren’t real women, in additon to skinny girls not being real women.
    I also think it is strange to congratulate to people for appreciating bigger women, as if it’s an accomplishment to find a beautiful woman beautiful because she’s not super skinny.
    And all the negativity around skinny women is upsetting because all women struggle to love their bodies. It’s one thing to criticize shannon for posting specific types of women, and another thing completley to reduce women to their size, whatever that size may be. Big can be beautiful without skinny being bad. What’s important is not size but health and self esteem. Both skinny and big girls (and everyone in between, I might add) can be unhealthy or healthy, and can have a good or bad self-image.
    Let’s not keep reinforcing binaries here….

    Interesting no one here actually mentioned this lovely lady’s art…..

  7. Personally I find the whole skinny/big/curvy/fit/etc/etc/etc so incredibly boring and pointless at this point. I really have no idea why people care one way or the other in terms of what’s posted in terms of the shape of the body, unless you’re coming here just to jerk off over very specific body types or something. Obviously it’s fun to see people you’re personally attracted to sexually, but I hope people read ModBlog for more than just that (not that I think there’s anything wrong with getting off on ModBlog!).

    My feeling is that pretty much everyone (male or female, independent of size) that I post here looks great, and it has a lot more to do with presentation, personality, and style than size and shape.

    (Very good points by copper_wire too)

  8. I have a terrible self-image – but guess what, I won’t bitch to Shannon because he posts PEOPLE HE FINDS ATTRACTIVE on HIS BLOG.
    I’m just sad because this gorgeous lady has enormous breasts, and I don’t.

  9. copper_wire, you just put all my thoughts into coherent sentences and for that I applaud you =)

  10. copper_wire, I *heart* you! Thank you for pointing this out…Your posts are always intelligent and thought provoking.

    At the same time, to the skinny girls upset that *for once* they are not the sexual preference, I’d say, go turn on the t.v. and turn it to any channel or flip open randomly any fashion/men’s magazine and feel instantly better about yourselves! I personally am not emaciated but certainly am still lean. I love to see big girls celebrated for a change!!! Big girl preference in our culture once and a while is not the same thing as the mass scale thin preference in our society that has young women across america starving themselves or throwing up their food in order to attain this ideal. I don’t see hundreds of thousands of young women struggling to force food down their throats in order to fit a mainstream ideal of “curvy” beauty…There is so much fat oppression in our culture that girls and women have to contend with. Viva curvy girls!!! I think it would be a huge leap forward to be able to see the above representation of beauty on the cover of fashion magazines/men’s magazines/on t.v. or in movies. Both because she is “curvy” and becuase she is heavily tattooed.

    Also, this particular woman and all of her tattoos is absolutely stunning! Gorgeous!!!

  11. Oh, also…to copper_wire’s point about “curviness”…I think there are plentiful representations in the media of celebration of non-curvy skinny women (fashion mags, runways, America’s Next Top Model), but few to none of non-curvy bigger women. Point taken.

    Shannon: I’m not sure if I agree with you or not. On the one hand, there still exists a mass scale problem of young women killing themselves literally to acheive a certain body type, and that concerns me deeply. On the other hand, I think part of the constant focus on women’s bodies serves to keep us distracted, insecure, and seperated by our competition and jealousy with one another.

    Where we’re at now, I still think it’s important work to push for a broader acceptable range of beauty standards in our culture….because I still see so many young women making themselves sick over this, and nobody seems to care anymore. I think if young men were killing themselves at the rate young women are, there would be a huge outcry, and it would be considered an epidemic.

    I think it’s still an important conversation to have.

  12. CW – i also dont like that “real woman” label or, for that matter “real man”. to give someone a compliment, isn’t to insult someone else… :/

    negative opinions about everything and anything are just thrown around here like mad. rather than thought-provoking discussion.

    tatgoddess: in canada the rate for men killing themselves is over 3x of women. Maybe it’s different where you are from?

  13. Toser, do you mean suicide rates, because my intention was in referring to eating disorder related health complications and deaths? I could have articulated that more clearly…

  14. I clicked on this entry because I like the tattoo. Then I noticed her nice face. She makes interesting art. If she would be around, i would like to talk with her to find out about her personallity – she seems to be interesting in many ways….
    Then I started to read the comment and was very surprised that people were actually commenting mainly about her size and shape. I had not noticed that about her and those comments surprise me. Of all the many many men and women I know, I usually like them because of the whole picture: personallity, pride, insecurity, abilities, desires, emotions and sexuality. For what we are! This certainly also includes sexuality. But it is strange and sad that people are focussed so much on particular sizes and that this also makes them feel so uncertain.

  15. Toser, #41:

    From the National Institute of Mental Health -

    An estimated 10 per cent of female college students suffer from a clinical or sub-clinical (borderline) eating disorder, of which over half suffer from bulimia nervosa.
    An estimated 1 in 100 American women binges and purges to lose weight.
    Approximately 5 per cent of women have anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or binge eating disorder.
    15 per cent of young women have significantly disordered eating attitudes and behavior.
    It is estimated that 200,000 to 300,000 Canadian women aged 13 to 40 have anorexia nervosa and twice as many have bulimia.
    An estimated 1 in 3 of all dieters develop compulsive dieting attitudes and behaviors.
    Of these, one quarter will develop full or partial eating disorders.
    In the UK, nearly 2 in every 100 secondary school girls suffer from anorexia nervosa,
    bulimia nervosa or binge eating disorder.
    Due to the incidence of co-occurring medical conditions, it is almost impossible to specify the morbidity rates for eating disorders like anorexia, bulimia or binge eating. However, general estimates suggest that as many as 10-15 per cent of eating disorders are fatal for those affected.
    Each day Americans spend an average of $109 million on dieting and diet related products.
    Many eating disorders go unreported
    Because of the guilt and consequent secretiveness of eating disorders (esp. bulimia and binge-eating) it is likely that many instances go unreported. Thus a higher incidence of eating disorders is almost certain.

    Increased social pressure to be thin
    According to studies into diet, weight loss and body shape, many individuals feel dissatisfied with their body shape, and develop sub-clinical / borderline eating disorder attitudes and behaviors. For example, 80 per cent of American women claim to be dissatisfied with their appearance and shape, and 1 in 2 American women are on a weight loss diet. The prevailing standards of body weight and shape, as revealed in the use of abnormally thin models in the media, continue to emphasize the idea that “thin is beautiful” and (one suspects) only make things worse for adolescents and adults with borderline anorexia, bulimia or binge eating disorders.


  16. tatgoddess – the issue isnt that the skinny girls are upset that they’re not the centre of attention for once, i agree that this girl is totally gorgeous and totally deserving to be the centre of attention! but i think Toser hit the nail on the head in saying that “to give someone a compliment, isn’t to insult someone else…” which is kinda how it comes across with the whole finally, a “real” woman attitude. believe it or not, some of us little ones would actually love to have some curves!

    having said that, now i feel bad that her comments have turned into a debate about society’s views on the ideal woman, rather on just how hot she is… I’M SORRY!

  17. a beautiful woman is a woman that is her self, you accept people for who they are not how they look and not by there flaws, (altho im not religious) a good thing is to take the log out of your own eye before you take the splinter out of someone elses,

    btw the most beautiful women ive ever seen

  18. tatgodess – i was asking about anorexia caused death rates being epidemic or not. as you had claimed they were.

    not cut and paste ‘research’ from a dieting website. i doubt all of those studies she has have been carried ouf by her, and there are no references in the entire page….its just a big advertisement! that anne collins person is just selling a diet…

  19. i definitly love the way that she used the light to accentuate the tattoos and not her body/face ect… she definitly knew how to use the same light to make the picture show how beautiful she is also… great shot!!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>